<
 
 
 
 
×
>
hide You are viewing an archived web page, collected at the request of University of Alberta using Archive-It. This page was captured on 16:26:15 Dec 08, 2010, and is part of the HCF Alberta Online Encyclopedia collection. The information on this web page may be out of date. See All versions of this archived page. Loading media information
Heritage Community Foundation Presents
Alberta Online Encyclopedia
SitemapSearchHelpContactPartnersEdukitsHome
Resource Inventory
History of Development
Innovation and New Technology Visit Alberta Source! Heritage Community Foundation
Heritage Trails presented courtesy of CKUA Radio Network Canada's Digital Collections

Home > History of Development > Leduc: Causes and Effects > Setting the Stage: Before 1947 > Early Exploration > Norman Wells

Leduc: Causes and Effects

Norman Wells

Imperial Oil Well No. 1 at Norman Wells, Northwest Territories, 1923. Before Leduc, the first oil-producing well in western Canada was in what is now Waterton in 1902. After this, the biggest oil boom was at Turner Valley on May 14, 1914. The Norman Wells were discovered in 1920. However, even the history of the Norman Wells begins much earlier. In 1789, Alexander Mackenzie explored the Mackenzie River. He made an observation about oil on the banks of the river. There would be many more reports of oil in that vicinity. It was in 1919, however, that Imperial Oil began exploratory drilling, using a cable tool rig, on the MacKenzie. 

The discovery of Norman Wells set off a search for oil in Alberta. As a result, some comparatively small discoveries were made: Viking-Kinsella field that resulted in a pipeline to Edmonton in 1923, and a discovery of gas in Lloydminster in 1934. Other finds included Wainwright in 1925 and Lloydminster in 1939. These finds however were not comparatively as large as Leduc was yet to become.

Back


Technology Through TimeHeroes of Resource DevelopmentPlaces to GoEarly Industry: Case StudiesLeduc: Causes and Effects


Albertasource.ca | Contact Us | Partnerships
            For more on natural resources in Alberta, visit Peel’s Prairie Provinces.
Copyright © Heritage Community Foundation All Rights Reserved