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Home > History of Development > Leduc: Causes and Effects > Results and Consequences > Petroleum Clubs > Desk and Derrick Club

Leduc: Causes and Effects

Desk and Derrick Club

Calgary Desk and Derrick Club, August 1955.  Nine of thirty-seven Desk and Derrick Club women who are travelling by train to New York City for a convention. The Edmonton chapter of the Desk and Derrick Club had their inaugural dinner meeting on April 18, 1951. It was there that Marjorie Brady was elected the first President. In July of the same year, the Association of Desk and Derrick Clubs of North America was formed. Shortly after this, on March 7, 1952, the Edmonton Desk and Derrick Club was affiliated, becoming the first in Canada. 

The purpose of the association is "to promote the education and professional development of individuals employed in or affiliated with the petroleum, energy and allied industries, and to enhance and foster a positive image to the global community by promoting the contribution of the petroleum, energy and allied industries through education by using all resources available." 

In 1957, "Greater Knowledge, Greater Service" was adopted as the motto of ADDC. Education has been provided for members through field trips and speakers, ranging from company CEOs to oil well firefighters. The first field trip of the first Canadian affiliate was appropriately to a drilling rig in Devon. This was in 1951, four years after the now famous Leduc No. 1 discovery. In 1962, Edmonton hosted their regional meeting. Region VII is the only region to date that has affiliates both north and south of the 49th parallel.

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