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Peace River Lowlands Wildlife

Peace River Lowlands: Tundra SwanThe overall diversity of wildlife is lower here than in the Central Mixedwood Subregion although many of the same species occur in both Subregions. However, the Peace-Athabasca Delta supports a rich wildlife population and is a major nesting and moulting ground for ducks, and a key staging and migration area for waterfowl such as the Tundra Swan. Bison and muskrats also use the large wet sedge meadows. 

White Pelicans nest along the Slave River and the most northerly populations and hibernacula of common (Red sided) Garter Snakes also occur in this Subregion.

The Peace River Lowlands  also possess very diverse fish populations.  Lake Whitefish, Northern Pike, Goldeneye, Emerald Shiner, Longnose Sucker, Trout-perch, Walleye, Ninespine Stickleback, Flathead Chub, Burbot, Spottail Shiner, Spoonhead Sculpin and Longnose Dace are common in the river and streams of this Subregion. Round Whitefish and Short-jawed Cisco are local and uncommon, and occur nowhere else in Alberta.


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