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Main Training Aircraft
in Canada

Private companies used Jennys

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Curtiss JN 4 or Jenny

The most important training aircraft in Canada during the First World War was the Curtiss JN 4 Canadian.

JN-4 used by Katherine Stinson The Royal Flying Corps (RFC) initiated the creation of the JN 4, requiring a modified version of the American Curtiss JN 3 for their flight training program starting later in 1917. Curtiss Aeroplane and Motors limited in Toronto built the JN 3. One modification incorporated into the new plane was that the lower wings were fitted with ailerons rather than depending on wing-warping to provide directional control.

The JN 4 was completed in December 1916. The prototype was tested in January 1917, before it went into full production at Canadian Aeroplanes limited in Toronto. This two-seater biplane was powered by the Curtiss OX, a water-cooled V-8 engine manufactured out of the United States.

The company went on to produce approximately 1,210 of these aircraft.

The Jenny was the first aircraft to be mass-produced in Canada, and to be exported to the United States for their training programs in 1917-1918.

 

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