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Jesuit College (1913-1942)

In 1906, Bishop Émile Legal invited the Jesuits to establish a college in Edmonton, and although they contemplated his offer and visited the city soon after, it was 1913 when the college is founded. The college provided a private education to boys, mostly at the elementary level, and was affiliated with Laval University. The Jesuits actively recruited boys from across the Canadian West.

The college was built at what were the outskirts of the city, between 114 and 115 streets, near St. Albert Trail. At its peak, there were 221 students, of whom no more than 10 were Anglophones.

The Great Depression put an end to the success of the school, and the Jesuits were unable to pay back the $100,000 they have incurred in debt. In 1942, the building is sold to Americans who use it as a staging area during the construction of the Alaska Highway. After the Second World War, it becomes the Charles Camsell hospital and caters to Aboriginal peoples.

Source:

  • Joseph Moreau, Le College des Jésuites (1913-1942), Aspects du passé franco-albertain, Histoire franco-albertaine, directeurs : A. Trottier, K.J. Munro, G. Allaire, Le salon d’histoire de la francophonie albertaine, Edmonton, 1980, 20-29 ; 25e anniversaire du collège Saint-François-Xavier, sous la dir. des Pères de la Compagnie de Jésus, 1939.

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