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Petroglyph

Petroglyphs are engraved carvings on stone while pictographs are paintings or designs made with paint or something close to paint on stone. These fine examples of a petroglyphs come from a remarkable site called Writing-On-Stone in southern Alberta. Now a part of a provincial park, Writing-On-Stone offers visitors a rare chance to see petroglyphs in their original context.

The Siksika, the people of the Blackfoot Nation which began to dominate southern Alberta several hundred years ago, named the site along the Milk River Aisinai’pi - "it has been written." What they found (and what they themselves added) were hundreds of petroglyphs (rock carvings) and pictographs (rock paintings), the largest single concentration of native rock art on the North American plains. While Archaeological evidence suggests that people have camped at Writing-On-Stone for at least 3,000 years, it appears most of the rock art is between 100 and 500 years old with some of the depictions possibly as old as 1,000 years. Very early works may have simply weathered away. If you do go to visit please do not touch them as they are already fading.

Writing Petroglyph

Writing Petroglyph

Writing-On-Stone

Writing-On-Stone

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