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Death of the Father
Media Sources: Tito & Yugoslavia


reigning order

Image: Tito salutes parading troops, tanks and artillery on a rainy day in Belgrade. Behind him is the Yugoslav Assembly building where his coffin was on view after his death. (Photo credit: National Archives, USA)

Sound: An American News Reel story during the Cold War period reports on joint military exercises undertaken by NATO and Yugoslavia. It extolls Tito's virtues as a military leader and praises Yugoslavia's non-alignment with the Soviet Union. (credit: National Archives, USA) --Load time: ~14 sec. s
greeting
Image: Tito traveled the former Yugoslavia in his "blue train" promoting his program of Brotherhood and Unity city by city. The people would mass along the tracks or at the train stations to greet him and shake his hand. When he died, his coffin was placed on his train which then traveled throughout Yugoslavia, passing crowds of mourners who lined the tracks and waited in train stations decorated with his portrait and sombre banners.(credit: licensed from Radio Television Serbia, RTS - All rights reserved)

Music:
Many songs were composed extolling Tito's virtues. Here is an excerpt from a popular song Comrade Tito which vows "Tito we will follow you." (credit: unknown, acquired from Tito's Homepage, an award-winning website published in Llublyana, Slovenia.) --Load time: ~22 sec. s
martial shadows
Image: Cases containing dozens of medals won by Tito for military valor are carried to the foot of his coffin which lies on display in the Yugoslav Assembly Building in Belgrade. Family and Yugoslav dignitaries are in sombre attendance, May 1980. (credit: licensed from Radio Television Serbia, RTS - All rights reserved)

Sound:
air-raid sirens and gun salute which were sounded at Tito's funeral. These are undoubtedly the same air-raid sirens that sound over Belgrade today as NATO bombs the city in punishment for President Melosovic's continued program of ethnic cleansing in Kosovo province. (credit: licensed from Radio Television Serbia, RTS - All rights reserved) --Load time: ~14 sec. s
bitter tears
Image: A few of the many thousand mourners who lined up for hours to file past Tito's coffin as it lay in the Yugoslav Assemby Building in Belgrade. Mourners were of all classes, ages, genders, races -- the common people and world dignitaries alike, from both great and young nations, both communist and capitalist. (credit: collage of materials licensed from Radio Television Serbia, RTS - All rights reserved)

Music:
an excerpt from sombre music played to accompany the on-going televsion coverage of Tito's death and funeral. Footsteps of those filing past the coffin may be heard in the background. Composer unknown. May 1980. (credit: licensed from Radio Television Serbia, RTS - All rights reserved) --Load time: ~30 sec. s
ethnic 'cleansing'
Image: The fracturing of Yugoslavia along ethnic lines began several years after Tito's death and has been accompanied by particularly vicious hatred, violence, and a program of ethnic cleansing and genocide. Whereas Bosnia was the site of much of this conflict in the early 1990s, at the end of the millenium, Kosovo has become the new killing fields. In this photo, a young Bosnian Muslim man is doused with water by two Serb police after being thrown out a window.(Photo credit: AP/World Wide Photos)

Sound:
excerpt from a Tito speech on the fraternity and unity of the nationalities of the former Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. (credit: unknown, acquired from Tito's Homepage, an award-winning website published in Llublyana, Slovenia.)
--Load time: ~11 sec. s

my brother's keeper?
Image: The Mostar bridge in Bosnia is blown-up by Croat soldiers in 1993 cutting off the Croat population on one side of the river, from the Muslim population on the other. During Tito's rule these two groups had lived and worked together as neighbors. Note the date and time stamp in the lower left corner which pin-points this moment in history. (credit: amateur video shot during the event).

Sound:
The sound of Tito's funeral train with an excerpt of music written to accompany television coverage. When he ruled Yugoslavia, Tito traveled the country on his "blue train" tirelessly selling his program of unity and brotherhood to peoples who had lived in mutual suspicion and hatred for centuries. When he died, his coffin was placed aboard this same train which then traveled throughout Yugoslavia so all could mourn him. Everywhere crowds lined the tracks singing songs and carrying signs which read "Tito we will follow you. From your path we will not stray."
--Load time: ~20 sec. s
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(c) 1999 John Borneman & Linda Fisher, All Rights Reserved