<
 
 
 
 
×
>
hide You are viewing an archived web page, collected at the request of University of Winnipeg using Archive-It. This page was captured on 04:27:10 Jul 14, 2017, and is part of the University of Winnipeg Websites collection. The information on this web page may be out of date. See All versions of this archived page. Loading media information
Cal Botterill

e-dition - Volume 24 Number 17

Cal Botterill

(27 years)

By Jo Snyder

Cal Botterill is an internationally acclaimed Professor of Sport Psychology at The University of Winnipeg. His fascination with sport has led him to National Team status in hockey, and to a career teaching, researching, and applying sport psychology. He is the father of two world-champion hockey players (Jason Botterill & Olympic gold medallist Jennifer Botterill), and husband to Doreen Botterill (Olympic speed skater).

He is also a pioneer in sport psychology in Canada and abroad-and a beloved University of Winnipeg professor. And the feelings are mutual.

"I've loved working at The University of Winnipeg," he said. "It is a personal place where you get to know students, we have small classes, a wonderful teaching tradition and super support staff. I've really enjoyed watching the transformation of some of my students; it's very satisfying."

 Throughout his illustrious career, Botterill has served as a sports psychology consultant to Canadian teams in eight Olympic games, five NHL teams, including1994 Stanley Cup champions the New York Rangers, and for countless local provincial and national athletes. He completed his graduate work at the University of Alberta before moving to Manitoba, where he had the distinction of being one of only two working in his field.

Over the years, he made a point of bringing his international experience to his classes. "I enjoyed sharing Olympic highlights/challenges with students via e-mail," recounted Botterill, who also shared his Olympic journal entries from the 2006 Torino Olympics with the wider University community in an (in)edition story last year.

Here, at The University of Winnipeg, his classes were always full. He was the first professor in the Kinesiology department to offer tele-courses.  And with charm and originality, Botterill threw himself into the production of what he referred to as his "shows" often using students as co-hosts, and sporting local and international guests.

Botterill is known on a personal level for offering advice and support to students and others involved in sport. For his utmost devotion to students and 'life changing' classes, Botterill was awarded the Clifford J. Robson Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching in 1994.

Botterill has authored many articles and books on sports psychology and high-level sports. He has enormously helped to popularize health and performance psychology and is often called upon as a commentator, contributing to UWinnipeg's reputation as a hub of sport psychology training and education.

In retirement, Botterill will serve as a part-time consultant in Olympic and regional sport, continue his role in medical education and spend time with family at their cottage in West Hawk Lake.

< Back to e-dition - Volume 24 Number 17