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TOPIC: Re:wider front tire
#584993
Callred (User)
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
I'm about to replace a Metzeler ME880 front tire that's damaged. The rear is almost new. If I choose another rear tire to match and place it on the front, why would I reverse it?
 
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#585001
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
I think it has something to do with the tread pattern of rear vs. front.....not really sure. I'm sure someone else will chime in that knows better than I do.
 
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jd750ace (User)
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
Fastjohnny puts out the older "wisdom" that led to the original "flipping" practice. It evolved from Europe originally, at least according to an article I read 20 years ago. The wisdom went that the tread pattern of a rear tire was designed to grip best when being stressed in the direction of delivering power to the ground, and a front is stressed in the opposite direction during heavy braking, so they turned the tire around. In reality, the tread design of a front and rear tire have lots to do with water dispersion and almost nothing to do with all-out grip. Block to void ratio affects grip and temperature control. I still do it, but it is in all likelihood totally un-necessary.
Some worry about tire construction being far different for a front versus a rear tire, and at one point, that was a major consideration, but today, with modern tire carcass construction, it matters not. Have never seen or heard a first person account of breaking a ply, knotting a tire, or having any kind of traction or tire failure issue due to running a rear on the front, backward or otherwise. Some will not do it, as is stated above, and that's fine. I currently have one on mine because I bought 2 Michelin Commander tires (original version) for 59.95 each from Jake Wilson when they closed them out, and I needed tires. Didn't think twice about it.

It is one of those things to me that is just an old worn out "biker myth" Just like "helmets break your collar bone when they slam into them in a crash" Complete bullcrap. Orthodpedists will tell you that a sharp blow to the point of the shoulder, or landing on your side with an extended arm are why so many collarbones get broken in motorcycle crashes.
 
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#585338
Callred (User)
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
I came in to post just what you said JD (found it in another forum)This is what I found, it was posted from an Avon page in '09, and since I asked the question, I can't say I have the answer.. just posting for additional information.:

"Tires Directional Arrows Explained By Avon Tyres
Published by Cyril Huze August 23rd, 2009 in Builders, Editorial and Wheels.
Before we can talk about directional arrows you must first understand a bit about tread patterns.
There are many different tread patterns but there is one main reason to have any tread and that
is to disperse water. (dust, dirt)

A tread pattern can be designed to disperse more water by making it rotate in only one direction.
Thus, the need for directional arrows. The arrow tells you which way to mount a tire for maximum
water dispersal. Another, less apparent reason for directional arrows is the tread splice.

What is a tread splice? When a tire is manufactured the tread portion of the tire starts out as
a long flat strip. This strip is wrapped around the tire and the two ends are cut on an angle
so one end overlaps the other rather than having square cut ends.
This overlapping point or splice offers a bigger surface area to bond together, rather than the
small surface area provided by square cut ends. (Imagine gluing your fingertips together, as
opposed to gluing along the entire length of your fingers laid on top of each other. Like an
angled splice, the overlapping fingers result in a much stronger bond).

To further ensure the strength of this bond along the tread splice the directional arrow will show
you which way to mount the tire so that when the rider is “on the gas”; the acceleration force on
the rear tire is pressing the splice together, rather than peeling it back.
As for braking, 80 % of the braking should take place in the front on most bikes. Therefore, the
front tread splice is run in the opposite direction than that of the rear, so when the rider is on
the brakes, he’s not peeling the tread splice back.

If you are using a tire that has a directional arrow for rear rotation only and for some reason you
want to put it on the front, make sure it is rotating in the opposite direction so you don’t
aggravate the tread splice. "
 
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#585354
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
Callred wrote:
I came in to post just what you said JD (found it in another forum)This is what I found, it was posted from an Avon page in '09, and since I asked the question, I can't say I have the answer.. just posting for additional information.:

"Tires Directional Arrows Explained By Avon Tyres
Published by Cyril Huze August 23rd, 2009 in Builders, Editorial and Wheels.
Before we can talk about directional arrows you must first understand a bit about tread patterns.
There are many different tread patterns but there is one main reason to have any tread and that
is to disperse water. (dust, dirt)

A tread pattern can be designed to disperse more water by making it rotate in only one direction.
Thus, the need for directional arrows. The arrow tells you which way to mount a tire for maximum
water dispersal. Another, less apparent reason for directional arrows is the tread splice.

What is a tread splice? When a tire is manufactured the tread portion of the tire starts out as
a long flat strip. This strip is wrapped around the tire and the two ends are cut on an angle
so one end overlaps the other rather than having square cut ends.
This overlapping point or splice offers a bigger surface area to bond together, rather than the
small surface area provided by square cut ends. (Imagine gluing your fingertips together, as
opposed to gluing along the entire length of your fingers laid on top of each other. Like an
angled splice, the overlapping fingers result in a much stronger bond).

To further ensure the strength of this bond along the tread splice the directional arrow will show
you which way to mount the tire so that when the rider is “on the gas”; the acceleration force on
the rear tire is pressing the splice together, rather than peeling it back.
As for braking, 80 % of the braking should take place in the front on most bikes. Therefore, the
front tread splice is run in the opposite direction than that of the rear, so when the rider is on
the brakes, he’s not peeling the tread splice back.

If you are using a tire that has a directional arrow for rear rotation only and for some reason you
want to put it on the front, make sure it is rotating in the opposite direction so you don’t
aggravate the tread splice. "
Finally an explanation that makes sense.
 
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#585412
jd750ace (User)
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
Duly noted! Always did it that way because that's what I learned to do but never totally understood, but that makes perfect sense. Thanks for posting.
 
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#585423
Callred (User)
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
If I may add one more thing, at least on the ME880s. I just noticed that they did it for us. Look at the front and rear tread on them:

http://www.nationalbiketyres.co.uk/motorcycle-tyres/metzeler-motorcycle-tyres/me880-marathon-rears/cat_104.html

So reversing the rear will make it just like a front tire, only bigger.

Thanks for all of the input. I'm learning a lot from this forum.

Cec
 
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#585432
takehikes (User)
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Re:wider front tire 5 Years ago  
A wider front tire (according to the "experts" has the same problems as a narrower one!
 
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