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Lorena Borjas

Interviewed By Lorenzo Van Ness

(Entrevista en Español) Lorena Borjas habla con Lorenzo Van Ness sobre su vida como activista de los derechos de las mujeres trans inmigrantes indocumentadas y trabajadoras sexuales en Jackson Heights, Queens, Nueva York. En esta amena conversación, Borjas comparte de su vida antes de venir a Estados Unidos, su llegada a Nueva York, el inicio de su trabajo comunitario y lo que tal trabajo conlleva. También narra la importancia de recibir reconocimientos por su trabajo y como está aprendiendo a cuidar su salud un poco mejor. (Resumen por Cynthia Citlallin Delgado.) / (Interview in Spanish) Lorena Borjas speaks to Lorenzo Van Ness about her life as an activist for the rights of undocumented migrant trans women sex workers in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York. In this convivial conversation, Borjas shares stories about her life prior to coming to the United States, her arrival in New York City, the beginning of her community work and what such work entails. She also speaks of the impo... Read more

(Entrevista en Español) Lorena Borjas habla con Lorenzo Van Ness sobre su vida como activista de los derechos de las mujeres trans inmigrantes indocumentadas y trabajadoras sexuales en Jackson Heights, Queens, Nueva York. En esta amena conversación, Borjas comparte de su vida antes de venir a Estados Unidos, su llegada a Nueva York, el inicio de su trabajo comunitario y lo que tal trabajo conlleva. También narra la importancia de recibir reconocimientos por su trabajo y como está aprendiendo a cuidar su salud un poco mejor. (Resumen por Cynthia Citlallin Delgado.) / (Interview in Spanish) Lorena Borjas speaks to Lorenzo Van Ness about her life as an activist for the rights of undocumented migrant trans women sex workers in Jackson Heights, Queens, New York. In this convivial conversation, Borjas shares stories about her life prior to coming to the United States, her arrival in New York City, the beginning of her community work and what such work entails. She also speaks of the importance of receiving public recognition for her work and how she is learning to take better care of her health. (Summary by Cynthia Citlallin Delgado.)

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Transcript

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Interview Data

Date of Interview
June 11, 2017
Location of Interview
El Rico Tino, Jackson Heights, New York
Place of birth
Mexico
Occupations
Patient Retention Specialist
Gender Pronouns
Ella
Rights Statement
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About This Collection

NYC Trans Oral History Project

NYPL's Community Oral History Project is teaming up with the NYC Trans Oral History Project to collect, preserve, and share oral histories from our city's transgender and gender non-conforming communities. 

We'll be training a community corps of interviewers to collect these largely undocumented oral histories in order to build a lasting and expansive archive on NYC transgender experiences.

About the NYC Trans Oral History Project:

We are a collective, community archive working to document transgender resistance and resilience in New York City. We work to confront the erasure of trans lives and to record diverse histories of gender as intersecting with race and racism, poverty, dis/ability, aging, housing migration, sexism, and the AIDS crisis. 

We are inspired by the public history activism of the ACT UP oral history project to build knowledge as a part of our anti-oppression work. We believe oral history is a powerful part of social justice work, and that building an alternative archive of transgender histories can transform our organizing for transgender liberation. 

You can listen to interviews, search interviews tags (like #genderfluidity #self-knowledge #gentrification and #queerfamily), and soon read transcripts. We hope the interviews and tags will preserve and proliferate new knowledges about trans and gender non-conforming experiences.

Content warning: Many of the interviews here include personal accounts of violence, sexual assault, abuse as children, or trauma.