<
 
 
 
 
×
>
hide You are viewing an archived web page, collected at the request of Smithsonian Institution using Archive-It. This page was captured on 15:12:37 Oct 22, 2015, and is part of the Smithsonian Institution Websites collection. The information on this web page may be out of date. See All versions of this archived page. Loading media information
 
  Public Programs

Calendar of Events

For Adults

For Kids

All Ages

Directions

Pet Policy


 

Upcoming Events

OCTOBER 2015
    123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
2015
October
November
December
2016
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September


October Events

8
CORAL REEF SOUNDSCAPES AND THEIR POTENTIAL RELEVANCE TO LARVAL FISH ORIENTATION
Weekly Seminar
Location: Schmidt Conference Center
Start: 11:00AM
End: 12:00PM
Speaker: Erica Staaterman
Affiliation: SERC
Acoustic conditions differ across habitats and can provide important information about biological composition and physical conditions. Recent studies have demonstrated that the larval stages of reef organisms may be able to detect and orient towards sounds of coral reefs. This hypothesis was further explored through a series of temporal and spatial acoustic recordings, as well as playback experiments and biophysical modeling. Based on these findings, I will discuss the potential relevance of reef soundscapes to larval organisms.
Cost: Free
Pre-Registration: No
14
LESSONS FROM THE CHESAPEAKE: 50TH-ANNIVERSARY KEYNOTE LECTURE
Evening Lecture
Location: Mathias Laboratory, Atrium
Start: 8:00PM
End: 9:00PM
Speaker: Tom Horton
Join award-winning environmental journalist Tom Horton Wednesday, Oct. 14, at SERC’s keynote 50th-anniversary evening lecture. Horton will reveal lessons learned during his 43 years covering the Chesapeake: what’s changed, what questions still need answers, and what it may ultimately take to save the Bay. The talk is free and open to all. A dessert reception in the Mathias Atrium will start at 7 p.m., followed by the lecture at 8.
Contact Info: Kristen Minogue (443-482-2325, minoguek@si.edu)
Age: High School-Adult
Cost: Free
Pre-Registration: No
15
MULTIPLE SCALES OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT INFLUENCE THE DISTRIBUTION AND INTERACTIONS OF AN INTRODUCED SEAGRASS AND ITS NATIVE CONGENER.
Weekly Seminar
Location: Schmidt Conference Center
Start: 11:00AM
End: 12:00PM
Speaker: Michael Hannam
Affiliation: SERC
Predicting invasive species impacts is an important goal of invasion biology, but it is complicated by the fact that invasion impacts can vary greatly depending on the biotic and abiotic context in which they occur. We examined the role of multiple scales of abiotic context in the distribution of introduced dwarf eelgrass (Zostera japonica) and its native congener (Zostera marina), as well as how fine-scale topographic context influences the interactions of these two species. Our results suggest that the native Z. marina is the dominant competitor where they co-occur, and that efforts to control the introduced Z. japonica should be undertaken cautiously at such locations.
Cost: Free
Pre-Registration: No
22
HISTORICAL ECOLOGICAL DATA – FOUR ‘JUST-SO’ STORIES FROM 1872 TO 1943
Weekly Seminar
Location: Schmidt Conference Center
Start: 11:00AM
End: 12:00PM
Speaker: Rick Osman
Affiliation: SERC
The commitment to collecting long-term ecological data has been a part of SERC and continues as part of the Forest and Marine GEO programs. This commitment recognizes the importance of an historical context for understanding the results of present ecological research and, particularly, for using those results to predict future ecological changes. A variety of much older historical data are becoming more accessible as older studies and publications become digitized. Four such studies provide a window on how the marine environment along the U. S. East Coast has changed over the past 150 years, as well as how ecological research has changed. These studies include Spencer Baird’s 1872 report to Congress on the causes of the decline in New England fisheries; 1888-89 surveys of east coast fisheries; a 1904-07 survey of the marine fauna of Buzzard’s Bay and Vineyard Sound; and one of the first experimental studies of marine invertebrates published in 1943.
Cost: Free
Pre-Registration: No