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19th
January
35 notes
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Meet Ching Ho Cheng: pop psychedelic painter, son of the Chinese ambassador to Cuba, and Chelsea Hotel resident. Read the new finding aid to his papers now available on our site. Ching Ho Cheng, 197-? / Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, photographer. Ching 
Ho Cheng papers, 1954-2014, bulk 1970-1989. Archives of American Art, 
Smithsonian Institution.

Meet Ching Ho Cheng: pop psychedelic painter, son of the Chinese ambassador to Cuba, and Chelsea Hotel resident. Read the new finding aid to his papers now available on our site.

Ching Ho Cheng, 197-? / Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, photographer. Ching Ho Cheng papers, 1954-2014, bulk 1970-1989. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

6 hours ago 35 notes

We are throwing a birthday party for painter Robert Motherwell! To mark the occasion, we will give away 101 free birthday cupcakes and share fun facts about Motherwell’s remarkable life. Join us in the Kogod Courtyard on January 24 at 1:00 pm. Details here

Birthday boy Robert Motherwell, 1952 / Kay Bell Reynal, photographer. [Photographs of artists taken by Kay Bell Reynal], 1952. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

5 days ago 63 notes
13th
January
33 notes
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Come join our team! Our Reference Services department is hiring a library tech in the D.C. office. For more details, see here. 

Resume, 1959. Philip Evergood papers, 1890-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Come join our team! Our Reference Services department is hiring a library tech in the D.C. office. For more details, see here

Resume, 1959. Philip Evergood papers, 1890-1971. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

6 days ago 33 notes

deckerlibrary:

Be sure to check out our new exhibit, Asian Ceramics in the Walters’ Collection, curated by Kathy Cowan!

Decker Library is fortunate to have a complete set (10 volumes) of the 1897 publication Oriental Ceramic Art by W.T. Walters, Stephen W. Bushell, and William M. Laffan (NK4165 .B77 1897 SECTIONS 1-10 CAGE) featuring the extensive asian ceramic collection of W.T. Walters, whose collection later became The Walters’ Art Museum.

“The images were fascinating: intensely realistic renderings of elaborate, gorgeous objects, floating (in many cases) on a featureless ground. When I noticed that many of the images included reflections of the landscape outside the room in which the paintings were made, it made them even more enjoyable. I later learned that the images were chromolithographs made by the Prang Company, from watercolors made by artists including James Callowhill who worked in a room of the Walters Mansion at 5 West Mount Vernon Place, so the reflections on the shiny surfaces of the objects were mini-cityscapes of 1889 Baltimore.”

Read more about the exhibit here.

Heeeeeeyyyyy, these look familiar. In our Louis Prang papers there is a color separation proof book for a chromolithograph of a vase, with a note on the cover that reads “Job 101; colors; Callowhill.” Probably from the same project?

image

Originally posted by archivesofamericanart

Color separation proof book, circa 1890. Louis Prang papers, 1848-1932. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

6 days ago 207 notes

This month’s Smithsonian magazine features a conversation with Patti Smith, musician/poet/artist/memoirist. She reflects on a love letter from Frida Kahlo to Diego Rivera from our collections, pictured above. The note is written on an envelope that held Kahlo’s watch and jewelry while she was a patient at St. Luke’s Hospital in San Francisco, briefly in 1940.

Smith observed: “The fact that it isn’t a profound letter makes it in some ways more special. She addressed it to "Diego, my love”–even though this is the most mundane, simplest correspondence, she still noted their love, their intimacy. She held the letter in her hands, she kissed it with her lips, he received it and held it in his hands. This little piece of paper holds their simplicity and their intimacy, the earthiness of their life. It contains the sender and the receiver.

As artists, every scrap of paper is meaningful. This is brown, folded. He saved it. Somebody kept it. It still exists.“

Frida Kahlo letter to Diego Rivera, 1940. Emmy Lou Packard papers, 1900-1990. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

1 week ago 279 notes

hyperallergic:

This week, David Bowie’s style as a GIF, Sean Penn and El Chapo, wealthy artists and grants, MOCA’s new permanent collection installation, and more.

Required Reading

1 week ago 220 notes
11th
January
2,743 notes
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americanlibraryassoc:

“I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.” - David Bowie
1987 READ poster: Bowie reading The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky


“I think I have done just about everything that it&rsquo;s possible to do&quot; - Bowie in an interview with the Telegraph

americanlibraryassoc:

“I don’t know where I’m going from here, but I promise it won’t be boring.” - David Bowie

1987 READ poster: Bowie reading The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

“I think I have done just about everything that it’s possible to do" - Bowie in an interview with the Telegraph

(via deckerlibrary)

1 week ago 2,743 notes

"Somehow they made a dent in me. Something was cool about them."

-

Glass artist Mark Peiser (1938-) talks about seeing lampwork glass pieces which inspired him to become a glassblower. Today is his birthday!

Oral history interview with Mark Peiser, 2004 February 26, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

1 week ago 23 notes
7th
January
126 notes
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Cornelia Chapin (1893-1972) was a sculptor known for her representations of animals. She created her sculptures by direct carving, a method introduced at the turn of the century by Constantin Brancusi. Rather than first building a model up out of some moldable material such as clay or wax, and then creating a cast, direct carvers begin with a block of wood or stone and carve away to achieve the desired shape. Chapin shared a studio for over 30 years with fellow sculptor Marion Sanford (1904-1987). Their papers are now fully digitized and available on our site. Cornelia Chapin at work, 1939 Apr. / Alfred Eisenstaedt, photographer. 
Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin papers, 1929-1988. Archives of 
American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Cornelia Chapin (1893-1972) was a sculptor known for her representations of animals. She created her sculptures by direct carving, a method introduced at the turn of the century by Constantin Brancusi. Rather than first building a model up out of some moldable material such as clay or wax, and then creating a cast, direct carvers begin with a block of wood or stone and carve away to achieve the desired shape. Chapin shared a studio for over 30 years with fellow sculptor Marion Sanford (1904-1987). Their papers are now fully digitized and available on our site.

Cornelia Chapin at work, 1939 Apr. / Alfred Eisenstaedt, photographer. Marion Sanford and Cornelia Chapin papers, 1929-1988. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

1 week ago 126 notes

cosmictravelerblog:

archivesofamericanart:

Today we present: A Very Important Archival Document that speaks volumes about a past era.

Jules Olitski note to Joan Olitski, 1999. Jules Olitski notes to Joan Olitski, 1981-2004. Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution.

Jules Olitski?

Yup, that Jules Olitski. Surprising that his Wikipedia page says NOTHING about his love of Judge Judy. 

Originally posted by yourreactiongifs

1 week ago 377 notes