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Oral Histories & Interviews

Below you will find a collection of interviews on Jack Pfister. Please enjoy!


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Gammage on Jack Pfister                              

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Horizon                                  

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To view written interviews, click on the links below.



Legacy That Speaks to Arizona's Future

My Turn, AZCentral.com, Sun Jul 28, 2013 8:00 PM

His suit was business basic. His glasses were standard black. His smile was genial. Jack Pfister looked unassuming, more like an affable favorite uncle than a high-profile executive. But few Arizonans have had as much power and influence for as many years.

Even fewer have stacked up such a broad record of public service, from education to the arts to growth policy.

Pfister shaped vital power, water and flood-control decisions as the top executive of Salt River Project from 1976 to 1991.

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Jack Pfister: A Voice From Prescott's Past Speaks To Arizona's Future

By Kathleen Ingley

“Local Boy Makes Good.” It’s a classic news story, and Prescott’s Jack Pfister was a classic example.

He oversaw one of the largest public power utilities in the nation, advised the state’s top leaders, put his time and energy into a wide range of causes and was the go-to person to lead the search for a solution on thorny issues. 

Jack died four years ago, at the age of 75. But his devotion to public service remains a model for Arizonans now and into the future.

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Jack Pfister and Babbitt