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Thursday, January 8, 2015

ART FOR THE POLE IMAGES FROM DIANE DWYER

BASHA RUTH NELSON  November, 2014
JOSEPH CONRAD-FERM  October, 2014
ELISA PRITZKER  September, 2014
"Immersed in the countryside life, I experience the human aspects of nature."
LAURA  KOPCZAK  August, 2014
MAGGIE GREEN  July, 2014
TIM LITZMANN  June, 2014
Untitled Palindrome 2014
CHRISTINA TENAGLIA  May, 2014
Untitled Pole Dangle (a conversation)
A dangle with colors based on my first conversation with Linda Montano, Saugerties, NY, Fall 2013. Most of the colors will wash away in the rain, some will not.
LYNN HERRING  April, 2014    
Poleformance  Click here for video of the performance.
ANGELA GAFFNEY SMITH    March, 2014 
"These mother and child linocuts are part of a series I have been working on for three years.  Marbles in twenty pockets represent the lives of children killed in Newtown, Ct.  We can’t forget them.  The top border holds broken crayons, a symbol of childhood lost and broken families.  All these elements are sewn together in a protective screening, which is what we need when it comes to the sale of firearms in this country." --Angela Gaffney Smith
MICHAEL NELSON   February, 2014These photos were taken in Rankin Inlet, Nunavuut, while on assignment photographing Inuit Art. With the protruding telephone poles against the arctic sky, they seem appropriate for the 'telephone pole project on John st'. Throw in the arctic vortex that has come our way in the last month, it's also a friendly reminder of where our neighbors from the North live." --Michael Nelson
ELIN MENZIES   January, 2014
"Every spring I paint these same flowers, irises, poppies, peonies and spider wort. It is an annual ritual that fits the ephemeral nature of Art For the Pole. The flowers are old friends that appear for a short while and have to leave but bring joy while they’re around. I hope the pictures of them on the pole do the same."
--Elin Menzies
BASHA RUTH NELSON  November, 2014
JOSEPH CONRAD-FERM  October, 2014
ELISA PRITZKER  September, 2014
"Immersed in the countryside life, I experience the human aspects of nature."
LAURA  KOPCZAK  August, 2014
MAGGIE GREEN  July, 2014
TIM LITZMANN  June, 2014
Untitled Palindrome 2014
CHRISTINA TENAGLIA  May, 2014
Untitled Pole Dangle (a conversation)
A dangle with colors based on my first conversation with Linda Montano, Saugerties, NY, Fall 2013. Most of the colors will wash away in the rain, some will not.
LYNN HERRING  April, 2014    
Poleformance  Click here for video of the performance.
ANGELA GAFFNEY SMITH    March, 2014 
"These mother and child linocuts are part of a series I have been working on for three years.  Marbles in twenty pockets represent the lives of children killed in Newtown, Ct.  We can’t forget them.  The top border holds broken crayons, a symbol of childhood lost and broken families.  All these elements are sewn together in a protective screening, which is what we need when it comes to the sale of firearms in this country." --Angela Gaffney Smith
MICHAEL NELSON   February, 2014These photos were taken in Rankin Inlet, Nunavuut, while on assignment photographing Inuit Art. With the protruding telephone poles against the arctic sky, they seem appropriate for the 'telephone pole project on John st'. Throw in the arctic vortex that has come our way in the last month, it's also a friendly reminder of where our neighbors from the North live." --Michael Nelson
ELIN MENZIES   January, 2014
"Every spring I paint these same flowers, irises, poppies, peonies and spider wort. It is an annual ritual that fits the ephemeral nature of Art For the Pole. The flowers are old friends that appear for a short while and have to leave but bring joy while they’re around. I hope the pictures of them on the pole do the same."
--Elin Menzies
       

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